Last edited by Shakasa
Thursday, April 23, 2020 | History

5 edition of The Black Death; And, the Dancing Mania found in the catalog.

The Black Death; And, the Dancing Mania

  • 14 Want to read
  • 15 Currently reading

Published by Dodo Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • History of science,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Science,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsB. G. Babington (Translator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages116
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8408008M
    ISBN 101406503487
    ISBN 109781406503487

    Five hundred years ago in July, a strange mania seized the city of Strasbourg. Citizens by the hundred became compelled to dance, seemingly for no reason — jigging trance-like for days, until unconsciousness or, in some cases, death. Ned Pennant-Rea on one of history's most bizarre events. Detail from a engraving by Hendrik Hondius. Other times music was played in the hopes of curing victims from their dancing hell. As Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker describes in his book, The Black Death and the Dancing Mania, the victims would take hands forming giant undulating circles, spinning round and round in ever-quickening loops. They’d yell, calling out to God or Satan or both. Although dancing mania was something confined to its period, some have identified modern-day activities that display some of its characteristics. It has been suggested that raving, an activity which became popular in the latter half of the 20th century, features characteristics of dancing mania.


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The Black Death; And, the Dancing Mania by J. F. C. Hecker Download PDF EPUB FB2

This book was published inand was written by a German physician. Split into two parts - the first part is the Black Death, and the Dancing Mania book second part is the Dancing Mania (which I still don't entirely understand).

Nevertheless, It is interesting how the topics were viewed nearly two hundred years ago/5(18). The Black Death / The Dancing Mania book.

Read 9 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Of course I'd heard of the Black Death, but I had never heard about the Dancing Mania.

While at times the book got a bit too detailed, I did find it a very interesting historical read, and enjoyed learning new things about the past!/5. The Black Death and The Dancing Mania by J. Hecker Contents. The Project Gutenberg Etext Header; THE BLACK DEATH; INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER I--GENERAL OBSERVATIONS; CHAPTER II--THE DISEASE; CHAPTER III--CAUSES--SPREAD; CHAPTER IV--MORTALITY; CHAPTER V--MORAL EFFECTS; CHAPTER VI--PHYSICIANS; THE DANCING MANIA.

This book was published inand was written by a German physician. Split into two parts - the Dancing Mania book first part is the Black Death, and the The Black Death; And part is the Dancing Mania (which I still don't entirely understand)/5.

Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by Project Gutenberg. The Black Death, and The Dancing Mania by J. Hecker - Free Ebook Project Gutenberg. The outbreak The Black Death; And Germany was called St. John's dance, but it wasn't the first appearance of the mania or the last, according to The Black Death and The Dancing Mania, originally published in Author: The Dancing Mania book Fessenden.

The black death and the dancing mania Item Preview remove-circle HEALTH: Added as part of Rare Book Project Bound in publisher's tan cloth with stamped the Dancing Mania book and spine, The Black Death; And stamped in gilt on front cover, and cream endpapers with publisher's advertisements digitized.

item 3 Black Death: The The Dancing Mania book Mania by Justus Friedrich Carl Hecker Paperback Book Fr - Black Death: The Dancing Mania by Justus Friedrich Carl Hecker Paperback Book Fr. $ Free shipping. No ratings or reviews yet. Be the first to write a review. Best Selling in Fiction & Literature.

Editions for The Black Death / The Dancing Mania: (Kindle Edition published in ), (Paperback published in ), (Paperback pub Cited by: 2.

Book Excerpt fell sick, remote from assistance, in the solitude of their country houses. Thus did the plague spread over England with unexampled rapidity, after it had first broken out in the county of Dorset, whence it advanced through the counties of Devon The Black Death; And Somerset, to Bristol, and thence reached Gloucester, Oxford and London.

The account of "The Black Death" here translated by Dr. Babington was Hecker's first important work of this kind. It was published inand was followed in the same year by his account of "The Dancing Mania." The books here given are the two that first gave Hecker a wide reputation.

Many other such treatises followed. THE DANCING MANIA CHAPTER I--THE DANCING MANIA IN GERMANY AND THE The Black Death; And SECT. JOHN'S DANCE The effects of the Black Death had not yet subsided, and the graves of millions of its victims were scarcely closed, when a strange delusion arose in Germany, which took possession of the.

Black death and the dancing mania. New York, Cassell & Co. [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors /. The Black Death and The Dancing Mania by J. Hecker translated by B.

Babington. Project Gutenberg Release # Select author names above for additional information and titles. Download the ebook in a format below. Additional formats may also be available from the main Gutenberg site. MANIA. Transcribed from the Cassell & Company edition by Jane Duff, proofed by David Price, email [email protected] The Black Death and The Dancing Mania.

FROM THE GERMAN OF J. HECKER. TRANSLATED BY B. BABINGTON. CASSELL & COMPANY, LIMITED: LONDON, PARIS, NEW YORK & MELBOURNE. INTRODUCTION4/5(1). Encyclopedia of the Black Death User Review - Book Verdict. These entries, e.g., "dancing mania," "fleas," "miasma theory," and "unicorn horn powder," focus on the plague as it related to society, particularly in the areas of economics, politics, religion /5(2).

The dancing plague (or dance epidemic) of was a case of dancing mania that occurred in Strasbourg, Alsace, (now modern day France) in the Holy Roman Empire in July Around people took to dancing for days without rest and, over the period of about one month, some of those affected collapsed or even died of heart attack, stroke, or.

A native of Erfurt, Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker, wrote a book published intitled The Black Death and the Dancing Mania, in which he collected numerous accounts of Dancing Mania, relating it to the horrific consequences of the Bubonic plague.

Share this book Listen 2 weeks for free. A 19th Century analysis of two of the 14th Century's most devastating pandemics: The Black Death, which is usually thought to be a form of bubonic plague, and the Dancing Mania, an unexplained epidemic that caused thousands of people to literally dance themselves to death.

A 19th Century analysis of two of the 14th Century’s most devastating pandemics: The Black Death, which is usually thought to be a form of bubonic plague, and the Dancing Mania, an unexplained epidemic that caused thousands of people to literally dance themselves to death.

St. John’s Dance, known historically as St. Vitus Dance, was a social phenomenon involving a type of dance mania that gripped mainland Europe between the 14 th and 17 th centuries. One of the most well-known major outbreaks took place in Aachen, Germany, on the 24 th of Junejust several decades after the Black Death swept across Europe.

During the outbreak, afflicted Author: Dhwty. The Black Death and the Dancing Mania Benjamin G. Babington, Justus F.

Hecker No preview available - The Black Death, And, the Dancing Mania (Classic Reprint). Dancing mania (also known as dancing plague, choreomania, St.

John's Dance and St. Vitus's Dance) was a social phenomenon that occurred primarily in mainland Europe between the 14th and 17th centuries. It involved groups of people dancing erratically, sometimes thousands at a time.

The mania affected men, women, and children who danced until they collapsed from exhaustion. About Book Book Description The work focuses on two of the most devastating phenomena ever suffered by the European population.

The deadly plague known as “Black Death” spread in late s while the “Dancing Mania” persisted from the 13th to 17th century where throngs of people suffered from a psychological problem. This book was published inand was written by a German physician. Split into two parts - the first part is the Black Death, and the second part is the Dancing Mania (which I still don't entirely understand).

Nevertheless, It is interesting how the topics were viewed nearly two hundred years ago/5(17). The Black Death and The Dancing Mania, by J.

Hecker, trans. by B. Babington (Gutenberg text) Filed under: Black Death -- History Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death (The Medieval Globe v1; ), ed.

by Monica Helen Green (PDF at Western Michigan University). The account of "The Black Death" here translated by Dr. Babington was Hecker's first important work of this kind. It was published inand was followed in the same year by his account of "The Dancing Mania." The books here given are the two that first gave Hecker a wide reputation.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Book from Project Gutenberg: The Black Death: The Dancing Mania Library of Congress Classification: RC. The Black Death The Dancing Mania lesson plan template and teaching resources.

This e-book text has been shared by Project Gutenberg Dance of death, also called danse macabre, medieval allegorical concept of the all-conquering and equalizing power of death, expressed in the drama, poetry, music, and visual arts of western Europe mainly in the late Middle ly speaking, it is a literary or pictorial representation of a procession or dance of both living and dead figures, the living arranged in order of their rank.

A 19th Century analysis of two of the 14th Century's most devastating pandemics: The Black Death, which is usually thought to be a form of bubonic plague, and the Dancing Mania, an unexplained epidemic that caused thousands of people to literally dance themselves to death.

Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker (5 JanuaryErfurt – 11 MayBerlin) was a German physician and medical writer, whose works appear in medical encyclopaedias and journals of the time. He particularly studied disease in relation to human history, including plague, smallpox, infant mortality, dancing mania and the sweating sickness, and is often said to have founded the study of the.

As Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker describes in his book, The Black Death and the Dancing Mania, the victims would take hands forming giant undulating circles, spinning round and round in ever. The Strasbourg dancing plague might sound like the stuff of legend, but it’s well documented in 16th century historical records.

It’s also not the only known incident of its kind. What was the disease that made people dance until they died. Can you imagine dancing for so longer until you dropped or your heart gave up. Could this be. Read online or Download The Black Death The Dancing Mania The Black Death The Dancing Mania by Justus Friedrich Carl Hecker == CLICK HERE == To Download or Read The Black Death The Dancing Mania ebook Overview: eBook Details: ISBN: ISBN X Published: 15th September For.

The Black Death and the Dancing Mania的话题 (全部 条) 什么是话题 无论是一部作品、一个人,还是一件事,都往往可以衍生出许多不同的话题。. The "Black Death" was first published init was written by J Hecker. It was then republished under a updated translation in Now Bonus Edition This story is the most complete story on the plague known as "The Black Death".

Born Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker (5 Januaryin Erfurt – 11 Mayin Berlin) was a German physician and medical writer. Just as the Great Fire of London took place one year after the Great Plague broke out, in the 14th Century, Germany and Latvia were still burying their dead from the Black Death, or bubonic plague, when they were hit by a strange epidemic--often called Dancing Mania, St.

John's Dance, or St. Vitus' Dance--that caused thousands of people to literally "dance" themselves to death.

50+ pdf Play all Mix - The Black Death YouTube; Welcome to the Renaissance - Duration: Michael James Scott - Topicviews. Something Rotten! Performs.The Black Death, and Download pdf Dancing Mania, by Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker The Project Gutenberg eBook, The Black Death, and The Dancing Mania, by Justus Friedrich Karl Hecker, Edited by Henry Morley, Translated by Benjamin Guy Babington This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever.Dancing plague ofevent in which ebook of citizens ebook Strasbourg (then a free city within the Holy Roman Empire, now in France) danced uncontrollably and apparently unwillingly for days on end; the mania lasted for about two months before ending as mysteriously as it began.

In Julya woman whose name was given as Frau (Mrs.) Troffea (or Trauffea) stepped into the street and.